occupy together

Starting September 17, 2011, adbusters (ironically, a Canadian magazine, called for the American people to #occupywallstreet (that’s twitter talk). Four weeks later, the movement is alive and growing throughout this great country, the US of A. Yes, we have it good compared to Iran or Somalia but it can be MUCH better. Too many people are unemployed, sick, unhealthy, over worked, misrepresented, and disenfranchised to be living in a so-called free society or even a democracy. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, watch Democracy Now some time!

I have copied a few of my favorite links,  images, or videos that are related to the OCCUPY WALL STREET movement below (this should keep you busy):

WE ARE THE 99 PERCENT! (tumblr page)

Read this letter please (EXCELLENT!!) :

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/10/12/1025555/-Open-Letter-to-that-53-Guy

My 2 favorite protest signs:

Watch the LeeCamp youtube channel:

“Greed is no longer Good. … The revolution would like to apologize for shitting all over your apathy.”

this guy is hilarious yet right on … “STOP THINKING POSITIVELY … wake up from your vacation of innovation.”

and most importantly,

Get rid of your television! It’s the best thing I’ve ever ever ever done!!!

peace, love & adventure!

Lala

HIPpyHOPpy [explicit]

New Podcast! [explicit lyrics]

my first hip hop album was LL COOL J’s Rock the Bells or was it the single, My Adidas by Run DMC or maybe even La Di Da Di by Slick Rick. It doesn’t matter, the point is that I’ve spent the past two weeks searching for decent hip hop that is void of just one of the following words:

  • Nigger
  • Bitch
  • Motherfucker
  • Ho

Sad to say I was unsuccessful. Hip hop music, simultaneously went mainstream and took a turn for the worst in the early nineties. I remember listening to N.W.A.’s Fuck tha Police and being blown away by the sheer bravado of it all — from the name of group to their outfits, attitude and lyrics. It was the perfect soundtrack for far too many incidents of police brutality happening at the time — with the Rodney King beating occurring just three years after this song was released.

Fast forward to 2010, while waiting for the train this week I noticed the November issue of XXL Magazine. I have never read this magazine but the cover got my attention so I photographed it with my iPhone.

November 2010 Cover of XXL Magazine

As the late great Marvin Gaye said, What’s Going On?

Look closely at this image. Do you see the penitentiary-like homosexual undertones here? Why is a grown-ass Black man wearing a mask standing behind a smaller built Black man who has his underwear on full display? I have never seen two Black men chillin’ like this in my neighborhood. So why? and I’m all about artistic expression but … Damn!

Per the U.S. Census Bureau, African-Americans account for only 14 percent of the U.S. population, yet an estimated 53 percent of all prisoners in the United States are Black. Don’t be misled, this is mostly due to racism and discrimination but those are the facts.

At first glance, most of these details were lost on me but at closer inspection, this image glamorizes prison life or a lifestyle that will eventually lead to death or prison and the sad thing is that both 50 Cent and Soulja Boy appear to be willing participants. Some people will do almost anything for fame and cash.

Dumb Down is the first full length track on my most recent podcast, it does a great job of highlighting the problems we are facing. Non-Black persons are not excluded. If you haven’t noticed, hundreds of thousands of men and women all over the world are emulating the hip hop community.

Tahir Hemphill

This past summer I met an artist named Tahir Hemphill who founded the project, Hip Hop Word Count that uses a series of algorithms to determine the education level needed to understand various rhymes, employing analytics of metaphors, similes, cultural references and other measures of sophistication.. Fascinating stuff, check it out here.

it can get better

Recently, many young people have taken their own lives because other cruel people and society made them feel worthless, strange, and different. Although I am not a homosexual, I emphatically support the gay community and I would like for every one to realize that WE ARE ALL CONNECTED and DESERVE LOVE in all forms — no matter your color, age, beliefs, nationality, economic status, or sexual orientation.

My brother’s girlfriend shared this video with me. It was produced by a few employees who make movie magic at Pixar Studios. We must BAN or speak out against artists/musicians/politicians/clergy men and women/family members and friends who ostracize or abuse others. Too many people speak as if being gay or transgender is a sin or bad thing. It absolutely is NOT and we must not tolerate this behaviour. It can get better if more of us, speak out against cruelty and violence done to members of the gay community.

Whether you are homosexual, bi-sexual or heterosexual, I am sure that you can relate to what is being said here. Acceptance and respect of other people directly relates to self-acceptance and self-love.

If you are gay and have considered, suicide, reach out to someone or go to:
The Trevor Project.

Please share this YouTube video with your loved ones and have a restful weekend!

*Lala*